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Saturday, January 25, 2020

Assemblywoman Luz Rivas Coffee and Conversation

 

Assemblywoman Luz Rivas invites you to come to enjoy free coffee and have a conversation on improving the safety and visibility of equestrian riders in our community.

Location: All Nations Church
10000 Foothill Blvd., Lake View-Terrace, CA 91342

Date: Saturday, January 25, 2020

Time: 9 AM - 11 AM

This is a RSVP event. For more information or to RSVP, please call my District Office at (818)504-3911 or email Jude.Hernandez@asm.ca.gov

RSVP Online

Friday, January 17, 2020

SACRAMENTO – Assemblywoman Luz Rivas (D-Arleta) reintroduces legislation to identify California homeless students, so they can receive the resources they need to succeed. “We can’t provide homeless children assistance if we are not identifying them in the first place,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas.

Assembly Bill (AB) 1937 is a continuation of previous legislation, AB 16, which sought to establish a comprehensive policy solution to assist local communities that are struggling to identify, and provide services to homeless families with children, but was vetoed last year. AB 1937 will create three geographically located County Offices of Education to develop Regional Technical Assistance Centers, to implement best practices used for identifying and connecting homeless students to services. Additionally, this legislation will create a standardized process for identifying homeless children across all of our school systems.

Assemblywoman Luz Rivas jointly led an audit looking into local and state policies used to identify and provide support to children experiencing homelessness. The California State Auditor found California’s K-12 education system has been ineffective at identifying and providing supportive services for homeless youth. The State has identified at least 200,000 homeless children, yet 400 school districts have failed to report a single homeless child. In response to the scathing report issued by the Auditor, AB 1937 incorporates key recommendations from the audit to ensure schools administer an annual housing questionnaire to identify homeless pupils so no child is left behind.

“The math does not add up,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas. “AB 1937 will identify homeless children who are hidden in plain sight at our public schools, so the state can deliver resources more effectively. The State Auditor’s report concluded that California is not adequately meeting the federal mandate to identify homeless students. It means nothing to be the state with the 5th largest economy, if we are failing our children by continuing to allow them to slip through the cracks. One homeless child, is one too many. We need to show these kids that we care, that they matter, and that we want them to succeed.”

“Student homelessness is not an issue that will simply go away if we pretend it isn’t happening,” said Assemblymember David Chiu (D-San Francisco). “If students experiencing homelessness are not being identified, they are not getting access to the services they need to be successful. I am proud to have lead on the audit that produced many of these recommendations and look forward to partnering with Assemblymember Rivas to ensure California is adequately supporting students experiencing homelessness.”

According to UCLA’s Center for the Transformation of Schools, there are 204,085 enrolled homeless students. The top 10 counties with enrolled homeless student are, Los Angeles (53,000), San Bernardino (24,300), Orange (24,200), Riverside (16,000), San Diego (15,300), Santa Barbara (8,700), Monterey (7,000), Sacramento (6,200), Kern (3,500), and Ventura (3,500). This data proves homelessness is a statewide problem and no longer confined to just our larger cities. While UCLA has been able to identify the state and county numbers on homeless pupils, California school districts are struggling to.

Assemblywoman Rivas proudly represents the 39th Assembly District, which includes the communities of Arleta, Lake View Terrace, Granada Hills, Mission Hills, North Hollywood, Pacoima, Sun Valley, Sunland-Tujunga, Sylmar, and San Fernando.

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CONTACT:
Judy Yee, Judy.Yee@asm.ca.gov, 916.319.2039

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

A new bill would require California students to learn about climate change as early as first grade and would make the subject a high school graduation requirement.

Assembly Bill 1922, introduced today by Assemblywoman Luz Rivas (D-North Hollywood), would mandate that students learn “the causes and effects” of climate change starting in 2025.

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — California schools may soon be required to teach about the causes and effects of climate change under a bill introduced on Monday.

Assemblymember Luz Rivas (D-Arleta) says under AB 1922, “climate change education will be a coursework requirement for students in grades 1 through 6, and a graduation requirement for students in grades 7 through 12, starting 2025.”

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

SACRAMENTOAssemblywoman Luz Rivas (D-Arleta) introduced Assembly Bill (AB) 1922, which will require California students to learn the causes and effects of climate change. Under this bill, climate change education will be a coursework requirement for students in grades 1 through 6, and a graduation requirement for students in grades 7 through 12, starting 2025.

California is seen as a world leader when it comes to environmentalism. In the 1970s, California adopted the California Environmental Quality Act to provide some of the strictest environmental reviews on new infrastructure projects. In 2006, California established the first comprehensive greenhouse gas regulatory program in the United States, and this year the Governor set aside $12 billion over the next 5 years to combat climate change. California is committed to maintaining its leadership.

“Climate change needs to be a part of our day-to-day academic discussion. This past decade has already started with extreme climate incidents occurring across the globe. As the youth that will inherit the brunt of climate change effects, we need them to be a part of the solution,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas. “AB 1922 will educate, help prepare, and give our next generation the tools to shape their futures in the wake of our current climate crisis.”

Students will not be the only ones learning about climate change. A recent study by the Nature Climate Change found that teaching children about climate change in schools also significantly increased the parents’ concern over the issue. Additionally, a National Public Radio poll found that 80% of parents in the U.S. supported the teaching of climate change, and 86% of teachers believe climate change should be taught at schools.

 “Greta Thunberg, the 17 year old activist, ushered in a new energy to the climate movement. Our youth are ready to join the solution,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas. “As our federal government takes a step back from environmental protection, California and our children are stepping in.”

“Education is power and we must give our students the tools to tackle the climate crisis,” said Mary Creasman CEO of the California League of Conservation Voters. “Students across California are facing the dire impacts of our climate crisis—missing class due to wildfires, power outages and pollution concerns. They should be equipped with the education to help improve their future. We applaud Assemblywoman Luz Rivas for introducing AB 1922, which takes a step to empower and educate younger generations.” 

Italy has taken the lead on the world stage by requiring every grade in its public school system to study climate change. This comes at a time when our federal government continues to limit funding and roll back key environmental policy. In order for California to maintain its leadership, we must educate our future generations on how to create a sustainable future. 

Assemblywoman Rivas proudly represents the 39th Assembly District, which includes the communities of Arleta, Lake View Terrace, Granada Hills, Mission Hills, North Hollywood, Pacoima, Sun Valley, Sunland-Tujunga, Sylmar, and San Fernando.

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CONTACT:
Judy Yee, Judy.Yee@asm.ca.gov, 916.319.2039

Monday, January 13, 2020

State Assemblywoman Luz Rivas (D-Arleta) has introduced the California Youth Empowerment Act to establish the first-ever statewide youth advisory body to the state government.

During a press conference on Wednesday, Jan. 8, Rivas said the duties of the Commission would include policy development, community engagement, and development of our youth to promote civic engagement, education, social equality, human and social services, workforce development, and public safety.

Friday, January 10, 2020

SACRAMENTO – Assemblywoman Luz Rivas (D-Arleta), member of the Assembly Budget Committee, has issued the following statement on Governor Newsom’s budget release: 

“It is exciting to see that the Governor is again being fiscally responsible by paying down debt and long term obligations, and investing in our state’s Rainy Day Fund, while appropriating investments in critical programs from previous years to bolster our economy,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas. “I also applaud the Governor for exploring the creation of an Agency focused on housing and homelessness. I look forward to working closely with his Administration as the year progresses. Homelessness is at a health and human safety tipping point, and this is a critical step in the right direction to ending homelessness.”

“The Governor’s proposed budget incorporates several key issues affect California including:

  • Significant investments to help local governments meeting housing production goals
  • Funding for 10,000 additional full-day/full-year preschool slots and subsidizing childcare for California’s working families
  • Making prescription drugs affordable
  • Expanding workforce development through grants and training in high need industries such as for trade, technology, and education
  • Prioritizing special education teacher recruitment and retention
  • Broadening Medi-Cal eligibility for undocumented individuals 65 years and older
  • Bolstering the State’s emergency preparedness and response
  • Prioritizing computer science education to keep California’s workforce globally competitive

I look forward to working with the Governor, Assembly Budget Chair Phil Ting, and my colleagues to develop a state budget that continues to exemplify the values of all Californians,” said Assemblywoman Luz Rivas.  

Assemblywoman Rivas proudly represents the 39th Assembly District, which includes the communities of Arleta, Lake View Terrace, Granada Hills, Mission Hills, North Hollywood, Pacoima, Sun Valley, Sunland-Tujunga, Sylmar, and San Fernando.

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CONTACT:
Judy Yee, Judy.Yee@asm.ca.gov, 916.319.2039

Friday, January 10, 2020
Thursday, January 9, 2020

Pacoima, Arleta and San Fernando Assemblywoman Luz Rivas has introduced a bill in the state Legislature that she says would allow underserved young people across the state to have a say in policy decisions that affect them. 

Her California Youth Empowerment Act - Assembly Bill 1858 - would establish a youth advisory commission, with the goal of spurring underrepresented young people to get civically engaged. 

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Dozens of youth gathered at the State Capitol yesterday to rally behind a new bill that would create the state’s first youth advisory committee. Assemblywoman Luz Rivas says although lawmakers work on legislation each year that affects young people, they are rarely included in the process.